Where is the Microbiome Located?

Where is the Microbiome Located?

The human microbiome is the collection of trillions of microorganisms that live on and in our bodies. These bacteria, fungi, and viruses outnumber our own cells 10 to 1. The microbiome is the keystone of human health; it has an enormous impact on our immune system, metabolism, and nervous system—even how we think!

What is the microbiome?

The microbiome is the collection of bacteria and other microbes that live in a particular environment. The gut microbiome, for example, is comprised of trillions of tiny organisms that help our bodies break down food and absorb nutrients—and it's found in many different areas of the body, including the mouth, skin, vagina and large intestine.

In addition to its role as an important part of digestion, the gut microbiome has been linked with autoimmune disorders like Chron's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC). UC symptoms include chronic diarrhea as well as rectal bleeding and abdominal pain; some research suggests that a diet high in sugar may contribute to flare-ups by destroying beneficial bacteria in your intestines.

Where is the Microbiome Located?

The microbiome is located in the gut, which is an organ about 3 to 5 feet long and 2 to 3 inches wide. The gut houses a diverse community of bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. The term “microbiome” refers to this entire community of microorganisms that live in our bodies.

The microbiome can be thought of as a second brain because it helps regulate our moods, weight and immune health—functions that are associated with the brain. If you don't have enough good bacteria (called probiotics) living in your body, then some functions won't work properly or at all! For example:

  • You may experience food intolerances if you do not have enough good bacteria living in your body (a condition called leaky gut syndrome).

  • Digestion problems like bloating after eating can also occur if digestive enzymes aren't produced by enough good bacteria living in your body (a condition called small intestinal bacterial overgrowth).

The Human Microbiome Project (HMP)

The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) is an NIH initiative to characterize the human microbiome. The HMP is a large-scale effort to identify and characterize the microorganisms that live in our bodies. The results provide a comprehensive understanding of normal microbial variation among healthy individuals, which helps reveal factors that contribute to disease and will inform strategies for preventing disease.

Learn all about the gut microbiome and its location in the body.

The word “microbiome” has been a buzzword in the health and wellness world for years. It's used to describe the collection of bacteria and other microbes that live inside our bodies, primarily in our digestive tracts.

The microbiome is made up of trillions of bacteria, fungi, viruses and archaea that play an important role in our health by helping us digest food and providing us with nutrients like B vitamins. The gut microbiome can also help regulate moods, metabolize medications or even fight off infections when needed!

Does this mean you should start adding more probiotics to your diet? Yes! Learn more about the Science of Gut Health and Nouri's Daily Probiotics here. 

Written by Caroline Beckman

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